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Article Published In Vol.8 (May-June 2020)

Climate Change and Transhumance Pastoralism in North-Central Nigeria

Pages : 409-414, DOI: https://doi.org/10.14741/ijmcr/v.8.3.9

Author : Onah, O. (PhD)., Akarugwo, A. E., Okeke, N.A. and Nwakile, T.C.

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The study investigated climate change and transhumance pastoralism in North Central Nigeria. Three research questions and one hypothesis guided the study. The population for the study was all the pastoralists in North Central Nigeria. Snowball sampling technique was used to select 210 respondents consisting of 30 respondents each from Kogi, Kwara, Nassarawa, Benue, Niger, Plateau and the Federal Capital Territory. A structured questionnaire validated by three experts from Department of Agricultural Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka with a Cronbach Alpha reliability coefficient of 0.88 was used for data collection from the respondents. Data from the research questions were analyzed with the used of percentages, frequencies counts, mean while data from the hypothesis was tested using Chi-square statistics at 0.05 level of significance. It was found out a majority of pastoralists in the area are male, in the age range of 31 – 40, married and had no formal education. The findings also revealed that there were eight impacts of climate change and three measures adopted by the pastoralists to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, the findings revealed that there was no significant relationship between the socioeconomic characteristics and measures adopted by pastoralists to mitigate climate change. Based on the findings, the study recommended among others that; The government at all levels has to ensure movement of pastoralists in and out of any community has to be adequately monitored and conflict resolution agencies have to be established to serve as a mediator between pastoralists and the host community members

The study investigated climate change and transhumance pastoralism in North Central Nigeria. Three research questions and one hypothesis guided the study. The population for the study was all the pastoralists in North Central Nigeria. Snowball sampling technique was used to select 210 respondents consisting of 30 respondents each from Kogi, Kwara, Nassarawa, Benue, Niger, Plateau and the Federal Capital Territory. A structured questionnaire validated by three experts from Department of Agricultural Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka with a Cronbach Alpha reliability coefficient of 0.88 was used for data collection from the respondents. Data from the research questions were analyzed with the used of percentages, frequencies counts, mean while data from the hypothesis was tested using Chi-square statistics at 0.05 level of significance. It was found out a majority of pastoralists in the area are male, in the age range of 31 – 40, married and had no formal education. The findings also revealed that there were eight impacts of climate change and three measures adopted by the pastoralists to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, the findings revealed that there was no significant relationship between the socioeconomic characteristics and measures adopted by pastoralists to mitigate climate change. Based on the findings, the study recommended among others that; The government at all levels has to ensure movement of pastoralists in and out of any community has to be adequately monitored and conflict resolution agencies have to be established to serve as a mediator between pastoralists and the host community members

Keywords: Climate change, Transhumance Pastoralism, North Central Nigeria

Climate change, Transhumance Pastoralism, North Central Nigeria

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